Mission Statement

In Design and Technology at Washington Academy we believe that the unique contribution of the subject to the education of our young people, is to develop both their technological capability and technological perspective. We believe that the students at Washington Academy should use the skills of design, technological innovation and design capability to solve problems of future generations.  Design and Technology at Washington Academy should teach its students to design and create solutions to an ever changing world.  It should allow its students to understand that everything that isn’t born or grown has been designed to solve an identified need or problem.

 

We attend to achieve these aims and qualities in our young people through an effective combination of teaching methods and pedagogical theory that will include the following:

Making without designing
Designing without making
Designing and making
Delivery of our mission statement

The following schemes of work should be taught in relation to the new D&T programmes of study.  The schemes of work are designed to give a broad and balanced D&T experience.  Through a variety of creative and practical activities, students should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They should work in a range of domestic and local contexts [for example, the home, health, leisure and culture], and industrial contexts [for example, engineering, manufacturing, construction, food, energy, agriculture (including horticulture) and fashion].  The scheme of work below is intended as a guide only.  The teaching of the content can be adapted to suit the teacher, group and resources available

 

Department Aims

The Design and Technology department follows the National curriculum. The national curriculum for design and technology aims to ensure that all students:

•      develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world

•      build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users

•      critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others

•      Understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook.

 

 

Subject Content

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, students should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They should work in a range of domestic and local contexts [for example, the home, health, leisure and culture], and industrial contexts [for example, engineering, manufacturing, construction, food, energy, agriculture (including horticulture) and fashion].

 

When designing and making, students should be taught to:

 

Design

•      use research and exploration, such as the study of different cultures, to identify and understand user needs

•      identify and solve their own design problems and understand how to reformulate problems given to them

•      develop specifications to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that respond to needs in a variety of situations

•      use a variety of approaches [for example, biomimicry and user-centred design], to generate creative ideas and avoid stereotypical responses

•      develop and communicate design ideas using annotated sketches, detailed plans, 3-D and mathematical modelling, oral and digital presentations and computer-based tools

Make

•      select from and use specialist tools, techniques, processes, equipment and machinery precisely, including computer aided manufacture

•      select from and use a wider, more complex range of materials, components and ingredients, taking into account their properties

Evaluate

•      analyse the work of past and present professionals and others to develop and broaden their understanding

•      investigate new and emerging technologies

•      test, evaluate and refine their ideas and products against a specification, taking into account the views of intended users and other interested groups

•      understand developments in design and technology, its impact on individuals, society and the environment, and the responsibilities of designers, engineers and technologists

Technological Knowledge

use the properties of materials and the performance of structural elements to achieve functioning solutions
•      understand how more advanced mechanical systems used in their products enable changes in movement and force

•      understand how more advanced electrical and electronic systems can be powered and used in their products [for example, circuits with heat, light, sound and movement as inputs and outputs]

•      Apply computing and use electronics to embed intelligence in products that respond to inputs [for example, sensors], and control outputs [for example, actuators], using programmable components [for example, microcontrollers].

Cooking and nutrition

As part of their work with food, students should be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in students will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables students to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life.

Students should be taught to:

•      understand and apply the principles of nutrition and health

•      cook a repertoire of predominantly savoury dishes so that they are able to feed themselves and others a healthy and varied diet

•      become competent in a range of cooking techniques [for example, selecting and preparing ingredients; using utensils and electrical equipment; applying heat in different ways; using awareness of taste, texture and smell to decide how to season dishes and combine ingredients; adapting and using their own recipes]

•      Understand the source, seasonality and characteristics of a broad range of ingredients.

 

Key Stage 3

The following modules are taught at Key Stage 3:

Year 7

In year 7 students, work in a range of local and domestic contexts.  The curriculum in year 7 is design to take an integrated approach to learning.  Students will undertake a series of related activities in which they design, but do not always make and often make without designing.

Design and Technology

Passive Speaker prototype
Acrylic Jewellery design
Designing in the style of an iconic designer
Laser CAM project
Ugly Doll project
Mass production project – Confectionary design
In cooking and nutrition students will:

Cooking and Nutrition

Hygiene and kitchen safety, 4C’s
Eat well plate, dietary needs  and key nutrients
Selection and safe use of equipment. Demonstrate: Knife skills, grate, peel, slice, simmer, boil, rubbing in, shape, bake, and deal with some high risk foods.
Year 8

In year 8 Students work in local and national domestic context of design and manufacturing products.  The curriculum in year 8 is design to take an integrated approach to learning.  Students will undertake a series of related activities in which they design, but do not always make and often make without designing. This context applies to all modules

Design and Technology

Minimalist lighting – Design a light using a low powered USB circuit
Architectural design project – Eco friendly starter homes
Pop-up book designs based on other designers work
Sustainable village project
Cooking and Nutrition

Food poisoning, key temperatures, conditions for bacteria
World foods, staple foods, healthy eating guidelines
Selection and safe use of equipment. Demonstrate: independence, refined knife skills, dealing with raw meat, sauce making, rubbing in raising agents.
Year 9

In year 9 students work in an industrial context of a wider scale to involve global issues.  The curriculum in year 9 is design to take an integrated approach to learning.  Students will undertake a series of related activities in which they design, but do not always make and often make without designing. This context applies to all modules.

Design and Technology

Furniture design based upon Design movements
Art Deco and De Stijl
Embedding sustainable design- Kieba project
Festival project – Stage design and design and manufacture a range of products to purchase or distribute at the music festival
Design movement fashion design
Cinema project
Cooking and Nutrition

Principles of nutrition and health
Cook a repertoire of predominantly savoury dishes so that they are able to feed themselves and others a healthy and varied diet
Become competent in a range of cooking techniques [for examples , selecting and preparing ingredients ; using utensils and electrical equipment; applying heat in different ways; using awareness of taste, texture and smell o decide how to season dishes and combine ingredients ; adapting and using their own  recipes
Sources and characteristics of a broad range of ingredients
Key Stage 4

Design and Technology at Key Stage 4 is an option subject here at Washington Academy.  At present the department offers the following three subject options at year 10 and 11:

 

GCSE Design and Technology

Level 1/2 Hospitality and Catering

Level 1/2 Design the Built Environment

 

Each course is taught by specialist subject teachers at Key stage 4 and students will study the following in the subjects:

 

Design and Technology

Exam board: AQA

Qualification: GCSE

Assessment: Examination – 50% / Controlled Assessment – 50%

 

What will I learn?

•How to design real solutions to design problems in a range of different materials and media

•How to understand and appreciate the design and manufacture of existing products.

•How to communicate realistic design proposals using different media and techniques.

•How to combine your design and making skills with knowledge and understanding.

• The opportunity to apply skills, knowledge and understanding from other subjects, where appropriate.

• How to develop your graphical capability through activities which involve a range of themes, materials and processes.

• Opportunities to develop practical abilities and the confidence to design, make and modify products and systems for different purposes and selecting and using materials effectively.

• How to develop ICT skills to use CAD/CAM during designing and making.

 

How will I learn?

You will learn how a to design in an industrial context by developing skills that are required to design and make, through task based projects using a combination of materials as well as theoretical components.

 

Essential Information on the course:

•          Unit 1: Written Paper -2 hours -50% of the total marks.

•          Unit 2: Controlled Assessment – A Design and make portfolio based around solving a design problem – 50% of the total marks

 

What abilities, aptitudes, skills and interests will I need?

To succeed you will be expected to:

 

•          Have an interest in finding out how things are designed and manufactured.

•          Enjoy designing products, modelling prototypes and manufacturing in materials.

•          Enjoy using CAD/ CAM or ICT based software programmes used to develop products.

•          Have an interest in designers and their influence on society

 

This course offers you the opportunity to develop all of these skills as well as evaluating products currently available to the consumer.

 

What opportunities can this course and qualification lead to?

•          To continue in further education such as A Level and Degree level Design level

•          Take an apprenticeship or career in one of the many design sectors such as: Advertising, Architecture, Automotive Design, Graphic Design and Illustration, Engineering, Fashion Designer, Furniture and related products, Industrial Design, Interior Design, Research and Software Engineer

 

Hospitality and Catering

Examination board: Eduqas

Qualification: Level 1/2

Qualification: GCSE

 

What will I Learn?

•          How chefs produce food for functions.

•          How to cater for different customer needs.

•          How to make healthy balanced meals.

•          How to cost and shop for ingredients.

•          How to produce restaurant quality food.

•          You will learn about the catering environment, and the role of individual staff.

•          You will also be taught health and safety and food hygiene.

 

Essential information on the course.

Unit 1- Catering skills related to food preparation & service. This consists of 1 externally set practical with supporting theory work WJEC tasks – 48 hours in total 50%

Unit 2 – Catering, hygiene, safety and legislation. This is a written examination 90 minutes that contains short answers, structured and free response questions on the catering and hospitality content. 50%

 

How will I learn?

You will learn by researching, planning and carrying out practical tasks. You will practice high level cooking skills and understanding the theory behind the cooking methods.

 

What abilities, aptitudes, skills and interests will I need?

To succeed you will be expected to:

•          Enjoy a challenge, and we prepared to work on your own initiative.

•          Show flair for high volume fast paced catering.

•          Planning and organisational skills.

•          Provide your own ingredients for many different practical tasks.

•          Work independently and sensibly. Be prepared to work independently and show initiative

•          Enjoy the subject, and be creative.

•          Have a keen interest in food and service.

 

What opportunities can this course and qualification lead to?

•          Continue in full time education e.g. Catering / Hospitality Diploma

•          Train as a chef/ apprenticeship course.

•          Work in the catering or hospitality industry.

•          Excellent practical skills.

Designing the Built Environment

Examination board: Eduqas

Qualification: Level 1/2 Technical award (equivalent to one GCSE)

Assessment: Examination – 40% / NEA – 60%

 

What will I learn?

The construction industry employs about 10% of the UK workforce and creates the buildings in which we work, live, study and enjoy our leisure time. It also creates the roads, railways, airports and seaports we use to help us travel to those buildings. If someone wants to add an extension to their home, add new office buildings on their land or turn a field into a sports centre, they need to:

• make sure they meet planning requirements

• use materials and structures that deliver a safe and efficient building

• provide access by road, rail or water

• ensure it can be built within budget.

Increasingly, society wants construction to be:

• Sustainable through using materials that are sourced sustainably and sustainable energy sources

• design conscious; providing buildings that are pleasant to look at and use.

These needs and wants are met through the design of the construction project.  You will learn the skills and knowledge required to deliver these needs.

 

How will I learn?

A Level 1/2 Award in Designing the Built Environment is designed to mainly support learners in schools and colleges who want to learn about the construction industry from the design, construction and planning perspective. It provides learners with a broad introduction to the design sector of the construction industry and the types of career opportunities available. It is mainly suitable as a foundation for further study. This further study could provide learners with the awareness of the work of different types of job roles in the sector such as architects, construction managers, design engineers, surveyors and planning officers. As a result, they may wish to start an apprenticeship or continue with their studies into higher education in order to pursue those job roles.

 

Essential Information on the course: (Current Assessment)

The qualification is taught through the following units:

•          Planning potential of construction projects (40% Examination)

•          Drawing construction plans (30% Non-Examination content)

•          Building structures and materials (30% Non-Examination content)

 

What abilities, aptitudes, skills and interests will I need?

This structure has been designed to allow learners to develop the understanding and skills related to a range of functional roles in the construction design sector. The units provide an overview of roles such as planning officers, design engineers and architect technicians and how these roles work together to produce construction designs that are fit for purpose.

You will need the following skills required for independent learning and development:

• A range of generic and transferable skills

• The ability to solve problems

• The skills of project-based research, development and presentation

• The fundamental ability to work alongside other professionals in a professional environment.

 

What opportunities can this course and qualification lead to?

The successful completion of this qualification, together with other equivalent qualifications, such as maths and sciences, could provide the learner with opportunities to access a range of qualifications including GCE, apprenticeships, vocationally related and occupational qualifications. These include:

• GCEs in Physics or Environmental Studies;

• Diplomas in Sustainable Construction and Built Environment Design

• Apprenticeships in the various Design, Surveying and Civil Engineering careers of construction.